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Am J Physiol. 1993 Apr;264(4 Pt 1):C761-82.

Transport of lactate and other monocarboxylates across mammalian plasma membranes.

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  • 1Department of Biochemistry, School of Medical Sciences, University of Bristol, United Kingdom.


Transport of L-lactate across the plasma membrane is of considerable importance to almost all mammalian cells. In most cells a specific H(+)-monocarboxylate cotransporter is largely responsible for this process; the capacity of this carrier is usually very high, to support the high rates of production or utilization of L-lactate. The best characterized H(+)-monocarboxylate transporter is that of the erythrocyte membrane, which transports L-lactate and a wide range of other aliphatic monocarboxylates, including pyruvate and the ketone bodies acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate. This carrier is inhibited by alpha-cyanocinnamate derivatives and some stilbene disulfonates and has been identified as a protein of 35-50 kDa on the basis of purification and specific labeling experiments. Other cells possess similar alpha-cyanocinnamate-sensitive H(+)-linked monocarboxylate transporters, but in some cases there are significant differences in the properties of these systems, sufficient to suggest the existence of a family of such carriers. In particular, cardiac muscle and tumor cells have transporters that differ in their Km values for certain substrates (including stereoselectivity for L- over D-lactate) and in their sensitivity to inhibitors. Mitochondria, bacteria, and yeast also possess H(+)-monocarboxylate transporters that share some properties in common with those in the mammalian plasma membrane but are adapted to their specific roles. However, there are distinct Na(+)-monocarboxylate cotransporters on the luminal surface of intestinal and kidney epithelia, which enable active uptake of lactate, pyruvate, and ketone bodies in these tissues. This article reviews the properties of these transport systems and their role in mammalian metabolism.

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