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Cancer Res. 1993 Dec 15;53(24):5853-5.

Microsatellite instability is associated with tumors that characterize the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma syndrome.

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  • 1Department of Medical Genetics, University of Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

Microsatellite instability implying multiple replication errors (RER+ phenotype) characterizes a proportion of colorectal carcinomas, particularly those from patients with the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma syndrome. We studied the incidence of microsatellite instability in more than 500 sporadic tumors representing 6 different types of cancer. Apart from colorectal carcinoma [see the paper by Lothe et al. (Cancer Res., 53:5849-5852, 1993)] the RER+ phenotype was found in 18% (6 of 33) of gastric carcinomas and 22% (4 of 18) of endometrial carcinomas. In contrast, no evidence of this abnormality was detected in cancers of the lung (N = 85), breast (N = 84), and testis (N = 86). Importantly, the first three cancers, as opposed to the latter three, are characteristic of the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma syndrome. These findings suggest that the cancers belonging to the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma tumor spectrum may have essential pathogenetic steps in common, including a tendency to multiple replication errors.

PMID:
8261393
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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