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Heart Lung. 1994 Mar-Apr;23(2):112-7.

The effect of early ambulation on patient comfort and delayed bleeding after cardiac angiogram: a pilot study.

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  • 1Foothills Hospital, Calgary, Alberta.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the effects of ambulation at 3 versus 6 hours on delayed bleeding, pain, and anxiety in patients after cardiac angiogram.

DESIGN:

Experimental, pretest posttest, random assignment.

SETTING:

Western Canadian University-affiliated tertiary care hospital.

PATIENTS:

Thirty-nine patients who underwent cardiac angiograms.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Delayed bleeding, pain, and anxiety.

INTERVENTION:

The experimental group ambulated at 3 hours after cardiac angiogram; the control group ambulated at 6 hours. Delayed bleeding was evaluated by sanguinous drainage through a standard gauze pressure dressing and/or the presence of a palpable hematoma greater than 5 cm in width. Melzack's Present Pain Intensity Scale and Spielberger's State Anxiety Inventory were used to evaluate patient comfort at 2, 4, and 7 hours after angiogram and the next day.

RESULTS:

None of the patients experienced any delayed bleeding. Student's t test was used to compare pain levels and anxiety scores. In addition, repeated measures analysis of variance was applied to pain scores taken at 4 hours, 7 hours, and the next day. The 2-hour observation data were used as a covariate and a basis for comparison of pain at the next three observations. Patients ambulating early had significantly less pain overall (p < 0.005) and less back pain at 4 and 7 hours after angiogram (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the mean anxiety scores.

CONCLUSION:

The significant decrease in back pain of patients who ambulated earlier demonstrates the need to consider patient comfort as well as the potential risks and sequelae of delayed bleeding.

PMID:
8206767
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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