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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1994 Mar 29;91(7):2395-400.

Dengue: the risk to developed and developing countries.

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  • 1Research and Medical Affairs, OraVax, Inc., Cambridge, MA 02139.

Abstract

Dengue viruses are members of the Flaviviridae, transmitted principally in a cycle involving humans and mosquito vectors. In the last 20 years the incidence of dengue fever epidemics has increased and hyperendemic transmission has been established over a geographically expanding area. A severe form, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), is an immunopathologic disease occurring in persons who experience sequential dengue infections. The risk of sequential infections, and consequently the incidence of DHF, has risen dramatically, first in Asia and now in the Americas. At the root of the emergence of dengue as a major health problem are changes in human demography and behavior, leading to unchecked populations of and increased exposure to the principal domestic mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. Virus-specified factors also influence the epidemiology of dengue. Speculations on future events in the epidemiology, evolution, and biological expression of dengue are presented.

PMID:
8146129
PMCID:
PMC43378
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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