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Biochem J. 1994 Mar 1;298 ( Pt 2):263-7.

Cloning and expression of a prostaglandin E receptor EP3 subtype from human erythroleukaemia cells.

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  • 1Sol Sherry Thrombosis Research Center, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19140.

Abstract

Prostaglandins inhibit platelet activation by stimulating intracellular cyclic AMP formation. We have postulated that intracellular cyclic AMP levels in platelets are buffered by a distinct prostaglandin receptor that mediates inhibition of cyclic AMP formation. In order to provide evidence for the model, we have cloned the cDNA coding for a prostaglandin receptor EP3 subtype, which is coupled to inhibition of adenylate cyclase, from the megakaryocytic cell line human erythroleukaemia (HEL) cells. A PCR-generated hybridization probe, produced using primers based on the sequence of the mouse prostaglandin EP3 receptor published by Sugimoto, Namba, Honda, Hayashi, Negishi, Ichikawa and Narumiya [(1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 6463-6466], was used to screen a lambda gt11 HEL cell cDNA library. The composite full-length cDNA clone HEP3, generated from the two partial clones pHEP3-7 and pHEP3-5, is 1.6 kb long with an open reading frame coding for 390 amino acids. This clone is 83% identical to the alpha subtype of the mouse EP3 receptor. The full-length construct was transfected into COS-1 cells. The cloned receptor exhibited the properties of a prostaglandin EP3 subtype, inhibiting forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP formation in response to prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and binding PGE2 with high specificity and a Kd of 3.2 nM. Radiolabelled PGE2 could be displaced by prostaglandins in the order PGE2 = PGE1 > iloprost = PGD2. Northern blot analysis revealed that the receptor is also present in human kidney.

PMID:
8135729
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1137934
Free PMC Article
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