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J Toxicol Environ Health. 1994 Mar;41(3):267-74.

Antagonism of cyanide intoxication with murine carrier erythrocytes containing bovine rhodanese and sodium thiosulfate.

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  • 1Department of Medical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Texas A&M University, College of Medicine, College Station 77843-1114.

Abstract

Murine carrier erythrocytes containing bovine rhodanese and sodium thiosulfate are being explored as a new approach to antagonize the lethal effects of potassium cyanide in mice. Prior studies indicated that these carrier erythrocytes persist in the vascular system for the same length of time as normal erythrocytes and can enhance metabolism of cyanide to thiocyanate. The present studies demonstrate the ability of these carrier red blood cells containing rhodanese and thiosulfate to antagonize the lethal effects of cyanide either alone or in various combinations with sodium nitrite and/or sodium thiosulfate. Potency ratios are compared in groups of mice treated with sodium nitrite, sodium thiosulfate, and carrier erythrocytes containing rhodanese and sodium thiosulfate either alone or in various combinations prior to the administration of potassium cyanide. These results indicate that the administration of carrier erythrocytes containing rhodanese and thiosulfate alone can provide significant protection against the lethal effects of cyanide. These carrier erythrocytes potentiate the antidotal effect of sodium thiosulfate alone or the combination of sodium nitrite and sodium thiosulfate. The mechanisms of cyanide antagonism by these carrier erythrocytes and their broader conceptual significance to the antagonism of other chemical toxicants are discussed.

PMID:
8126749
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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