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Pediatrics. 1994 Feb;93(2):221-7.

Intellectual impairment in children of women who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Erratum in

  • Pediatrics 1994 Jun;93(6 Pt 1):973.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the relationship between maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy and children's intellectual functioning during the first 4 years of life.

DESIGN:

Prospective follow-up of participants in a randomized trial of pregnancy and infancy nurse home visitation.

SETTING:

Semi-rural community in Upstate New York.

PARTICIPANTS:

400 families in which the mothers registered before the 30th week of pregnancy and had no previous live births. Eighty-five percent of the mothers were either teenagers (< 19 years at registration), unmarried, or poor. Analysis limited to whites who comprised 89% of the sample.

MAIN RESULTS:

Children in the comparison group whose mothers smoked 10 or more cigarettes per day during pregnancy had Stanford-Binet scores at 3 and 4 years of age that were 4.35 (95% CI: 0.02, 8.68) points lower (after controlling for a wide range of variables) than their counterparts whose mothers did not smoke during pregnancy.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this study add to the increasingly consistent evidence that maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy poses a unique risk for neurodevelopmental impairment among children and provide an additional reason for pregnant women not to smoke cigarettes.

PMID:
8121734
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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