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Am J Infect Control. 1994 Aug;22(4):231-5.

Surveillance of intravenous catheter-related infections among home care clients.

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  • 1Department of Mental Health, Community, and Administrative Nursing, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco 94143-0608.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Infection control in home care is an important area of study, and infection related to home infusion therapy is one component.

METHODS:

According to billed supplies from a 6-month period, we identified clients receiving intravenous care and conducted a chart review to determine characteristics and infection status. We reviewed each client from the start of a continuous home care period through April 30, 1992.

RESULTS:

Care of the catheters was done by nurses, family care givers, or the clients themselves. Intravenous catheter-related infections-site infections and bacteremia-occurred in three (4.5%) of the sample of 67; bacteremia occurred in one (1.5%). Incidence density was 12.5 infections per 10,000 catheter days (4.2 bacteremias per 10,000 days). Among those with central lines who remained without infection, 22.9% had the same line in place for 90 days or more. Among those with peripheral lines who remained without infection, 14.3% had a peripheral line, which was changed during home care, for 30 days or longer.

CONCLUSIONS:

Home care agencies seeking accreditation from the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations need to establish surveillance systems; this may be one method to monitor device-related infections and to determine baseline rates.

PMID:
7985824
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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