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Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Nov;60(5):757-64.

A prospective study of diet and the risk of symptomatic diverticular disease in men.

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  • 1Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115.

Abstract

To examine the association between dietary fiber, sources of fiber, other nutrients, and the diagnosis of symptomatic diverticular disease, we analyzed data from a prospective cohort of 47,888 US men. During 4 y of follow-up we documented 385 new cases of symptomatic diverticular disease. Total dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with the risk of diverticular disease after adjustment for age, energy-adjusted total fat intake, and physical activity [relative risk (RR) 0.58; 95% CI 0.41, 0.83; P for trend = 0.01 for men in the highest as compared with the lowest quintile of dietary fiber]. This inverse association was primarily due to fruit and vegetable fiber. For men on a high-total-fat, low-fiber diet, the RR was 2.35 (95% CI 1.38, 3.98) compared with those on a low-total-fat, high-fiber diet, and for men on a high-red-meat, low-fiber diet the RR was 3.32 (95% CI 1.46, 7.53) compared with those on a low-red-meat, high-fiber diet. These prospective data support the hypothesis that a diet low in total dietary fiber increases the incidence of symptomatic diverticular disease. They also provide evidence that the combination of high intake of total fat or red meat and a diet low in total dietary fiber particularly augments the risk.

PMID:
7942584
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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