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J Histochem Cytochem. 1994 May;42(5):681-6.

Three-dimensional relationships between tumor cells and microcirculation with double cyanine immunolabeling, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and computer-assisted reconstruction: an alternative to cast corrosion preparations.

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  • 1Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iowa, Iowa City.

Abstract

The morphology of the microcirculation of uveal melanomas is a reliable market of tumor progression. Scanning electron microscopy of cast corrosion preparations can generate three-dimensional views of these vascular patterns, but this technique sacrifices the tumor parenchyma. Formalin-fixed wet tissue sections 100-150 microns thick from uveal melanomas were stained with the lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEAI) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) to demonstrate simultaneously the tumor blood vessels and proliferating tumor cells. Indocarbocyanine (Cy3) was used as a fluorophore for UEAI and indodicarbocyanine (Cy5) was used for PCNA. Double labeled sections were examined with a laser scanning confocal microscope. Images of both stains were digitized at the same 5-microns intervals and each of the two images per interval was combined digitally to form one image. These combined images were visualized through voxel processing to study the relationship between melanoma cells expressing PCNA and various microcirculatory patterns. This technique produces images comparable to scanning electron microscopy of cast corrosion preparations while permitting simultaneous localization of melanoma cells expressing PCNA. The microcirculatory tree can be viewed from any perspective and the relationship between tumor cells and the tumor blood vessels can be studied concurrently in three dimensions. This technique is an alternative to cast corrosion preparations.

PMID:
7908912
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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