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Mol Endocrinol. 1994 Oct;8(10):1298-308.

Localization of the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R) in neuroendocrine and autonomic control circuits in the brain.

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  • 1Vollum Institute for Advanced Biomedical Research, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland 97201-3098.

Abstract

POMC, the precursor of ACTH, MSH, and beta-endorphin peptides, is expressed in the pituitary and in two sites in the brain, in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the commissural nucleus of the solitary tract of the brain stem. Little is known regarding the functions of melanocortin (ACTH and MSH) peptides in the brain. We report here the detailed neuroanatomical distribution of the MC4-R mRNA in the adult rat brain. The melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3-R), characterized previously, was found to be expressed in arcuate nucleus neurons and in a subset of their presumptive terminal fields but in few regions of the brainstem. The highly conserved MC4-R is much more widely expressed than MC3-R and is pharmacologically distinct. MC4-R mRNA was found in multiple sites in virtually every brain region, including the cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus, brainstem, and spinal cord. Unlike the MC3-R, MC4-R mRNA is found in both parvicellular and magnocellular neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, suggesting a role in the central control of pituitary function. MC4-R is also unique in its expression in numerous cortical and brainstem nuclei. Together, MC3-R and/or MC-4R mRNA are found in every nucleus reported to bind MSH in the adult rat brain and define neuronal circuitry known to be involved in the control of diverse neuroendocrine and autonomic functions. The high degree of conservation, distinct pharmacology, and unique neuronal distribution of the MC4 receptor suggest specific and complex roles for the melanocortin peptides in neuroendocrine and autonomic control.

PMID:
7854347
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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