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Am J Physiol. 1995 Jan;268(1 Pt 1):E1-5.

Effect of insulin on uric acid excretion in humans.

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  • 1Metabolism Unit, University of Pisa, Italy.

Abstract

Although hyperuricemia is a frequent finding in insulin-resistant states, insulin's effect on renal uric acid (UA) handling is not known. In 20 healthy volunteers, diastolic blood pressure, body weight, and fasting plasma insulin were positively (and age was negatively) related to fasting plasma UA concentrations, together accounting for 53% of their variability. During an insulin clamp, urine flow was lower than during fasting conditions (1.01 +/- 0.12 vs. 1.56 +/- 0.32 ml/min, P = 0.04), whereas creatinine clearance was unchanged (129 +/- 7 and 131 +/- 9 ml/min, P = not significant). Hyperinsulinemia did not alter serum UA concentrations (303 +/- 13 vs. 304 +/- 12 microM) but caused a significant decrease in urinary UA excretion [whether expressed as absolute excretion rate (1.66 +/- 0.21 vs. 2.12 +/- 0.23 mumol/min, P = 0.03), clearance rate (5.6 +/- 0.8 vs. 7.3 +/- 0.8 ml/min, P = 0.03), or fractional excretion (4.48 +/- 0.80 ml/min vs. 6.06 +/- 0.64%, P < 0.03)]. Hyperinsulinemia was also associated with a 30% (P < 0.001) fall in urine Na excretion. Fractional UA excretion was related to Na fractional excretion under basal conditions (r = 0.59, P < 0.01) and during the insulin period (r = 0.53, P < 0.02). Furthermore, the insulin-induced changes in fractional UA and Na excretion correlated with one another (r = 0.66, P < 0.001). Physiological hyperinsulinemia acutely reduces urinary UA and Na excretion in a coupled fashion.

PMID:
7840165
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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