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J Hepatol. 1995 Feb;22(2):165-72.

Endotoxemia in patients with chronic liver diseases: relationship to severity of liver diseases, presence of esophageal varices, and hyperdynamic circulation.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, Veterans General Hospital-Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China.

Abstract

Plasma endotoxin levels were investigated using a quantitative Limulus assay in patients with chronic liver diseases and correlated with the severity of liver diseases, the presence of esophageal varices, and hemodynamic parameters. The plasma endotoxin levels were significantly higher in chronic hepatitis patients with acute exacerbation (10.1 +/- 1.3 pg/ml, n = 13, p < 0.05) and patients with cirrhosis (7.0 +/- 0.7 pg/ml, n = 126, p < 0.05) than in healthy subjects (2.9 +/- 0.2 pg/ml, n = 45). Chronic hepatitis patients (n = 30) had plasma endotoxin levels which were similar to those in healthy subjects (4.6 +/- 0.5 vs. 2.9 +/- 0.2 pg/ml, p > 0.05) but lower than those in chronic hepatitis patients with acute exacerbation (4.6 +/- 0.5 vs. 10.1 +/- 1.3 pg/ml, p < 0.05). Endotoxemia (plasma endotoxin level > 5.7 pg/ml) was found in 27%, 85% and 41% of patients with chronic hepatitis, chronic hepatitis with acute exacerbation, and cirrhosis, respectively. In patients with cirrhosis, the plasma endotoxin levels progressively increased in relation to the severity of liver dysfunction (Pugh's class A/B/C = 4.9 +/- 0.5/7.9 +/- 1.4/10.2 +/- 2.0 pg/ml, p < 0.05). In contrast, plasma endotoxin levels were comparable between patients with cirrhosis with and without esophageal varices (p > 0.05). Chronic hepatitis patients with acute exacerbation (no collaterization) had much higher plasma endotoxin levels than those in patients with cirrhosis and large varices (p < 0.05), whereas compensated patients with cirrhosis and large esophageal varices had plasma endotoxin levels similar to those seen in chronic hepatitis patients (no collaterization) (p > 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
7790704
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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