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Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Jul;86(1):85-91.

Evaluation of current urodynamic testing methods in the diagnosis of genuine stress incontinence.

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  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the sensitivity and specificity of several urodynamic testing methods in the diagnosis of genuine stress urinary incontinence (GSI).

METHODS:

One hundred eight consecutive patients were evaluated prospectively by history and physical examination, cough stress test, and single and multichannel urodynamics. Sensitivities and specificities in detecting genuine stress incontinence were calculated for: a positive cough stress test with a negative cystometrogram, equalization throughout a cough urethral pressure profile, a positive stress leak-point pressure determination, observed urine loss with cough during multichannel urodynamics, and a pressure transmission ratio of less than 90% for each third of the urethra.

RESULTS:

Sixty-five patients (60%) were found to have GSI. Observed urine loss with cough during multichannel studies was 91% sensitive and 100% specific. A positive stress leak-point pressure determination had a 78% sensitivity and was 100% specific. A positive cough stress test with a negative cystometrogram was 77% sensitive and 100% specific. Pressure equalization throughout the length of the urethra during a cough urethral pressure profile was 49% sensitive and 98% specific. A pressure transmission ratio of less than 90% in the distal, middle, and proximal urethra had sensitivities and specificities of 54 and 79%, 51 and 65%, and 45 and 58%, respectively. A pressure transmission ratio of less than 90% along the entire length of the urethra was 22% sensitive and 93% specific.

CONCLUSION:

Observed urine loss with cough during multichannel urodynamics was the best examination for diagnosing GSI in our population.

PMID:
7784028
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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