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Insect Biochem Mol Biol. 1995 Apr;25(4):455-65.

Glutathione S-transferases from larval Manduca sexta midgut: sequence of two cDNAs and enzyme induction.

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  • 1Department of Entomology, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721, USA.

Abstract

Two glutathione S-transferase (GST) clones from a larval midgut cDNA library of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta were sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of the first clone, M. sexta GST1, encoded a protein of 217 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 24,644 and isoelectric point of 4.8. The M. sexta GST1 was 45.9-48.6% identical to GSTs from Musca domestica and several Drosophila species. The M. sexta GST2 cDNA encoded a protein of 203 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 23,596 and isoelectric point of 5.5. The M. sexta GST2 shared 44.8-50.0% sequence identity to a second cluster of insect GSTs from M. domestica, D. melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae. GST1 and GST2 were only 24.1% identical in amino acid sequence. The divergence of these two classes of insect GSTs occurred before the radiation of Diptera and Lepidoptera. Northern analysis of the expression of these GSTs showed increased GST1 mRNA levels in midguts of larvae fed diets containing 2-undecanone, or phenobarbital. Midgut and fat body cytosolic GST activities were induced when larvae were fed diets containing 2-tridecanone, 2-undecanone, or phenobarbital. Partial purification of midgut GSTs by size-exclusion and glutathione affinity chromatography resulted in a series of isoelectric focusing bands, with the major one corresponding to the predicted isoelectric point of the M. sexta GST1. In summary, two midgut GSTs have been identified on the basis of cDNA sequence and one of these, GST1, was inducible by dietary chemicals.

PMID:
7742833
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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