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J Cell Biol. 1995 Apr;129(2):489-506.

In vivo analysis of cadherin function in the mouse intestinal epithelium: essential roles in adhesion, maintenance of differentiation, and regulation of programmed cell death.

Author information

  • 1Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110, USA.

Abstract

A model system is described for defining the physiologic functions of mammalian cadherins in vivo. 129/Sv embryonic stem (ES) cells, stably transfected with a dominant negative N-cadherin mutant (NCAD delta) under the control of a promoter that only functions in postmitotic enterocytes during their rapid, orderly, and continuous migration up small intestinal villi, were introduced into normal C57B1/6 (B6) blastocysts. In adult B6<->129/Sv chimeric mice, each villus receives the cellular output of several surrounding monoclonal crypts. A polyclonal villus located at the boundary of 129/Sv- and B6-derived intestinal epithelium contains vertical coherent bands of NCAD delta-producing enterocytes plus adjacent bands of normal B6-derived enterocytes. A comparison of the biological properties of these cell populations established that NCAD delta disrupts cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, increases the rate of migration of enterocytes along the crypt-villus axis, results in a loss of their differentiated polarized phenotype, and produces precocious entry into a death program. These data indicate that enterocytic cadherins are critical cell survival factors that actively maintain intestinal epithelial function in vivo.

PMID:
7721948
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2199905
Free PMC Article
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