Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Chest. 1995 Apr;107(4):1053-7.

Magnetic resonance angiography of the central chest veins. A new gold standard?

Author information

  • 1Department of Radiological Sciences, Deaconess Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The systemic chest veins may be difficult to show comprehensively by contrast venography, especially if there is limited venous access or contraindications to intravenous contrast. As an alternative, can magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) reliably detect occluded chest veins and predict suitable sites for central venous access?

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Eighty-four patients were examined using breath-hold time-of-flight MRA and three-dimensional image reconstruction. Thirty-three were evaluated to identify possible central venous access. Fifty-seven patients were examined to diagnose and stage central venous occlusion.

RESULTS:

The associated diagnoses were malignancy 46, parenteral nutrition 21, hemodialysis 6, chemotherapy 4, and other long-term venous access 7. Of the 28 patients in whom MRA predicted a patent site for central venous access, satisfactory access was achieved. In two patients, cannulation of veins shown to be occluded on MRA was attempted unsuccessfully. Correlation with contrast venography was available in 17. There was agreement with MRA concerning the level of occluded veins in all cases. Contrast venography did not show all patent veins, including some accessed during surgical line placement.

CONCLUSION:

Compared with surgical line placement or contrast venography, MRA of the systemic chest veins is accurate. Patent and occluded chest veins are reliably defined, including potential sites for central line placement, in a way that is not possible with other techniques. MRA may be the new "gold standard" for defining systemic venous anatomy in the chest.

PMID:
7705116
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk