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J Clin Microbiol. 1993 Jun;31(6):1525-30.

Common somatic O and heat-labile serotypes among Campylobacter strains from sporadic infections in the United States.

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  • 1Division of Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333.

Abstract

Somatic O (formerly heat-stable) and heat-labile (HL) serotyping methods are commonly used to type Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolates. Although both systems are effective, the labor and time required for each have limited their application. These systems can be simplified by reducing the number of antisera used. To find an appropriate panel of antisera, we determined the distribution of common serotypes in the United States among a representative sample of 298 Campylobacter isolates. The strains, obtained between July 1989 and June 1990 from persons with sporadic cases of diarrhea, were collected from 19 randomly chosen counties in all geographic (census) regions of the United States. All strains were serotyped by the O and HL systems. By phenotypic methods, 288 C. jejuni, 9 hippurate-negative C. jejuni/C. coli, and 1 Campylobacter lari were identified. Of 57 O antisera, 24 typed 252 (84.6%) strains. Of the 55 HL antisera, 23 serotyped 253 (84.9%) strains. All strains were typeable in the unabsorbed O antisera. In the absorbed HL antisera, four strains were nontypeable and 14 were rough and untypeable. In each geographic region, 9 or more O and HL serotypes were found. Serotypes O:1, O:4, and O:13,16,43,50 and HL 1 were identified in all regions. The combination of both schemes gave greater discrimination than either system alone, but the maintenance of both requires a large resource investment. A serotyping scheme incorporating the 24 most prevalent O and 23 most prevalent HL serotypes could be useful for outbreak support and for surveillance. In the near future, we anticipate using a molecular subtyping method in combination with limited serotyping to distinguish Campylobacter strains.

PMID:
7686183
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC265572
Free PMC Article
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