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J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 1995 Sep;50(5):M235-41.

Evaluating the risk of dependence in activities of daily living among community-living older adults with mild to moderate cognitive impairment.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although cognitive impairment has been implicated as a risk factor for dependence in activities of daily living (ADLs), little is known about the risk of ADL dependence among older adults with cognitive impairment.

METHODS:

Among a representative cohort of 1,103 community-living adults aged 72 years and older, we evaluated the 237 subjects with mild to moderate cognitive impairment who were independent in their basic ADLs. All cohort members had undergone a comprehensive assessment, including a battery of qualitative and timed performance tests.

RESULTS:

ADL dependence developed in 31 (16%) of the 197 subjects who had complete data at the 1-year follow-up. Of the self-reported characteristics, only three--living alone, not being currently married, and having an impairment in IADL function--were significantly associated (p < .05) with the onset of ADL dependence. Several simple tests of physical performance, on the other hand, were strongly associated with the development of ADL dependence. Both timed and qualitative performance tests successfully identified subjects at risk for ADL dependence. A combination of two performance tests--rapid gait and qualitative chair stands--was particularly effective at distinguishing subjects at low (4.7%) and high (34%-39%) risk for ADL dependence.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among community-living older adults with mild to moderate cognitive impairment, the risk of ADL dependence is high but varies considerably depending on how well and how quickly one can perform simple tasks of everyday function. An assessment strategy based on tests of physical performance may allow clinicians to identify subgroups of cognitively impaired elders at low and high risk for ADL dependence.

PMID:
7671024
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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