Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
QJM. 1995 Aug;88(8):551-7.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and hospitalization for acute renal failure.

Author information

  • 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, UK.

Abstract

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been implicated in the aetiology of acute renal failure (ARF), but epidemiological studies examining this association have produced disparate results. We conducted a case-control study using a purpose-built record-linkage database for a population of 420,600 patients, resident in Tayside since May 1990. Patients (n = 207) hospitalized with a diagnostic code for ARF between 1990 and 1992 had their diagnosis validated by a renal physician. Six community controls and two hospital controls, matched for age and sex, were generated for each of these cases. Exposure to dispensed oral NSAIDs, topical NSAIDs and aspirin during the 90 days prior to the index date were investigated (recent exposure), as was exposure at any time since January 1989 (previous exposure). The most significant associations were modelled using conditional logistic regression. When community controls were used, recent exposure to NSAIDs and previous exposure to aspirin were independently associated with hospitalization for ARF, with adjusted odds ratios of 2.20 (1.49-3.25) and 2.19 (1.46-3.30), respectively. Only recent exposure to oral NSAIDs was associated when hospital controls were used: 1.84 (1.14-2.93). No significant interactions were present with previous chronic renal failure, other possible causes of ARF or whether the diagnosis was primary or secondary. There is an approximate doubling of the risk of hospitalization for ARF with use of oral NSAIDs.

PMID:
7648241
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk