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Ann Surg. 1995 Aug;222(2):109-19.

Orthotopic liver transplantation in fulminant and subfulminant hepatitis. The Paul Brousse experience.

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  • 1Hepato-Biliary Center, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The authors report on the experience of orthotopic liver transplantation in fulminant hepatitis at Paul Brousse Hospital.

SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA:

Liver transplantation is a breakthrough in the treatment of patients with fulminant hepatitis. However, the indications, the timing for transplantation, the type of transplantation, and the use of ABO incompatible grafts in this setting still are debated.

METHODS:

Transplantation was indicated in patients with confusion or coma and factor V less than 20%, younger than 30 years of age, and confusion or coma and factor V less than 30% older than 30 years of age.

RESULTS:

Among 139 patients who met the aforementioned criteria for transplantation, 1 recovered, 22 died before transplantation, and 116 underwent transplants with a 1-year survival of 68%. Survival was 83% in patients with grade 1 and 2 comas at transplantation versus 56% (p < 0.001) in those with grade 3 comas; it was 51% versus 81% (p < 0.001) in those transplanted with high risk (ABO-incompatible, split, or steatotic) and low-risk grafts, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, steatotic and partial grafts were predictive of poorer patient survival, and ABO incompatibility was predictive of poorer graft survival.

CONCLUSIONS:

Orthotopic liver transplantation is an effective treatment in fulminant hepatitis. Use of high-risk grafts permitted transplantation of 83% of patients, but was responsible for higher mortality.

Comment in

PMID:
7639578
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1234768
Free PMC Article
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