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J Pediatr. 1995 Jul;127(1):147-51.

A randomized, controlled trial of the efficacy of a heparin and vancomycin solution in preventing central venous catheter infections in children.

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  • 1Division of Oncology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether adding vancomycin to central venous catheter (CVC) flush solution would significantly reduce the incidence of bacteremia attributable to luminal colonization with vancomycin-susceptible organisms.

STUDY DESIGN:

Fifty-five children with cancer and eight children given total parenteral nutrition by the surgery or nutrition support services were randomly assigned to receive a heparin CVC flush solution (n = 31) or a heparin-vancomycin CVC flush solution (n = 32).

RESULTS:

During 9158 catheter days, 6.5% of the patients in the heparin group and 15.6% of the patients in the heparin-vancomycin group had bacteremia attributable to luminal colonization with vancomycin-susceptible organisms (p = 0.43). The mean rates of bacteremia attributable to luminal colonization with vancomycin-susceptible organisms were 0.6/1000 catheter days in the heparin group and 1.4/1000 catheter days in the heparin-vancomycin group (p = 0.25). There was no significant difference between the groups when the time to the first episode of bacteremia attributable to luminal colonization with a vancomycin-susceptible organism was compared by means of Kaplan-Meier survival estimates. Streptococcus viridans infection was not attributable to luminal colonization.

CONCLUSION:

The addition of vancomycin to heparin CVC flush solution did not reduce bacteremia with vancomycin-susceptible organisms. Bacteremia with Streptococcus viridans was not related to the use of a CVC.

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PMID:
7608801
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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