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Ann Epidemiol. 1995 May;5(3):221-8.

A prospective study of alcohol, smoking, caffeine, and the risk of symptomatic diverticular disease in men.

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  • 1Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

The relationship between smoking, caffeine, and alcohol intake and the risk of symptomatic diverticular disease has not been investigated directly. We examined these associations in a prospective cohort of 47,678 US men, 40 to 75 years old. During 4 years of follow-up (1988 to 1992), we documented 382 newly diagnosed cases of symptomatic diverticular disease. After adjustments for age, physical activity, and energy-adjusted intake of dietary fiber and total fat, alcohol intake (comparing those who drink > 30 g of alcohol/d to nondrinkers) was only weakly and nonsignificantly associated with risk of symptomatic diverticular disease (relative risk (RR) = 1.36; 95 percent confidence interval (CI), 0.94 to 1.97; P for trend = 0.37). We observed no association between caffeine, specific caffeinated beverages, and decaffeinated coffee and the risk of symptomatic diverticular disease. Current smoking was not appreciably associated with risk of symptomatic diverticular disease compared to nonsmokers (RR = 1.25; 95 percent CI, 0.75 to 2.09) after adjustment for age, physical activity, and energy-adjusted intake of dietary fiber and total fat. In a subset analysis restricted to men who had undergone sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, a modest positive association was seen between smoking and risk of symptomatic diverticular disease. These results suggest that smoking, caffeine, and alcohol intake are not associated with any substantially increased risk of symptomatic diverticular disease.

PMID:
7606311
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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