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J Clin Oncol. 1995 Nov;13(11):2705-11.

Testicular germ cell tumors and human immunodeficiency virus infection: a report of 26 cases. Italian Cooperative Group on AIDS and Tumors.

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  • 1Division of Medical Oncology and AIDS, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano, Italy.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Besides tumors that are diagnostic of AIDS, such as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, and invasive carcinoma of the cervix, other tumors have been described in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) setting. Some case reports on testicular cancer in HIV-infected patients have appeared in the literature. We present a retrospective study on 26 cases of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) observed within the Italian Cooperative Group on AIDS and Tumors (GICAT) between November 1986 and September 1994.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Twenty-six patients with TGCT and HIV-infection from the GICAT were retrospectively analyzed.

RESULTS:

Fourteen patients had seminoma and 12 had nonseminoma. Four patients underwent only orchidectomy, one patient received only chemotherapy, nine patients were treated with postsurgical chemotherapy, 10 patients (38%) received postsurgical radiotherapy, one patient received postsurgical chemotherapy plus radiotherapy, and one patient was lost for follow-up evaluation immediately after diagnosis. The complete response (CR) rate was 95%. Relapse occurred in 32% of patients. The median follow-up time was 33 months. The mortality rate was 37%. Causes of death were neoplasia in three of nine patients, AIDS in five of nine patients, and fortuitous event in one of nine patients. The overall 3-year survival rate was 65%, and the 3-year disease-free survival rate was 65%. Severe hematologic toxicity was observed in seven of 15 patients.

CONCLUSION:

HIV-infected patients with testicular cancer should be offered standard oncologic therapy, irrespective of their HIV status, since the majority can be cured of their tumor and have a good quality of life. Use of concomitant prophylaxis for opportunistic infections is recommended.

PMID:
7595728
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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