Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1995 Aug 15;207(4):445-51.

Effects of disease on the results of diagnostic tests for use in detecting hyperadrenocorticism in dogs.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine, Animal Medical Center, New York, NY 10021, USA.

Abstract

The purpose of the study reported here was to assess 3 commonly used screening tests for hyperadrenocorticism (low-dose dexamethasone suppression test, ACTH stimulation test, and urinary cortisol:creatinine ratio) in dogs with various diseases other than those of the adrenal glands (nonadrenal diseases). A group of 100 dogs was studied: 59 dogs with nonadrenal disease, 21 clinically normal dogs, and 20 dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. Of 59 dogs with nonadrenal disease, 20 (34%) had high baseline cortisol concentration (greater than reference range limits), and 22 (38%) and 33 (56%) had inadequate serum cortisol suppression at 4 and 8 hours, respectively, after administration of a low dose of dexamethasone. Compared with clinically normal dogs, dogs with nonadrenal disease had significantly (P < 0.05) higher mean serum cortisol concentration at 4 and 8 hours after administration of a low dose of dexamethasone; however, significant differences were not detected between the mean cortisol concentration at 8 hours after administration for dogs with nonadrenal disease and for dogs with hyperadrenocorticism. After ACTH stimulation, only 8 of 59 (14%) dogs with nonadrenal disease had high serum cortisol concentrations. Significant differences did not exist after ACTH stimulation between mean cortisol concentration of clinically normal dogs and that of dogs with nonadrenal disease. Of 59 dogs with nonadrenal disease, 45 (76%) had a high urinary cortisol:creatinine ratio. When compared with clinically normal dogs, dogs with nonadrenal disease had a significantly higher mean urinary cortisol:creatinine ratio, but significant differences did not exist between the mean urinary cortisol:creatinine ratio of dogs with nonadrenal disease and that of dogs with hyperadrenocorticism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Comment in

PMID:
7591942
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk