Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Radiographics. 1995 Jul;15(4):893-917.

From the archives of the AFIP. Musculoskeletal angiomatous lesions: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

Author information

  • 1Department of Radiologic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC 20306-6000, USA.

Abstract

Vascular lesions of bone and soft tissue are relatively common musculoskeletal neoplasms. Hemangioma is the most frequently encountered angiomatous lesion. Osseous hemangioma commonly involves the spine and calvaria and often has a characteristic radiographic appearance, with either coarsened trabeculae lying adjacent to the vascular channels or multifocal lytic areas creating a honeycomb pattern. Soft-tissue hemangioma is the most frequent soft-tissue neoplasm of infancy and childhood. Radiography and computed tomography (CT) may show phleboliths in cavernous soft-tissue hemangioma. The magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearance, however, is often more distinctive, because fat overgrowth and serpentine vascular channels can be seen. Lymphangioma usually occurs in the neck and axillae of young children as a soft-tissue mass composed of large cavernous spaces and is well evaluated with CT, ultrasound, or MR imaging. Vascular lesions can also diffusely involve both bone and soft tissue in angiomatosis. A group of more aggressive vascular neoplasms, including hemangioendothelioma, hemangiopericytoma, and angiosarcoma, may have a nonspecific imaging appearance; however, the vascular pattern can be recognized in some cases, allowing radiologic diagnosis. Imaging is important throughout the evaluation of angiomatous lesions for detection, diagnosis, preoperative assessment, and treatment.

PMID:
7569134
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk