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Oncogene. 1995 Jul 20;11(2):291-301.

A human homologue of the Drosophila tumour suppressor gene l(2)gl maps to 17p11.2-12 and codes for a cytoskeletal protein that associates with nonmuscle myosin II heavy chain.

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  • 1Department of Developmental Genetics, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg, Germany.

Abstract

Inactivation of the tumour suppressor gene lethal(2) giant larvae (D-lgl) of Drosophila leads to malignant transformation of the presumptive adult optic centers in the larval brain and tumours of the imaginal discs. These malignancies result from the disorganization of a cytoskeletal network in which the D-LGL protein participates. Here we describe the isolation of a cDNA encoding the human homologue to the D-lgl gene designated as hugl. The hugl cDNA detects a locus spanning at least 25 kilobases (kb) in human chromosome band 17p11.2-12, which is centromeric to the p53 gene and recognizes a 4.5 kb RNA transcript. The hugl gene is expressed in brain, kidney and muscle but is barely seen in heart and placenta. Sequence analysis of the hugl cDNA demonstrates a long open reading frame, which has the potential to encode a protein of 1057 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 115 kDaltons (kD). To further substantiate and identify the HUGL protein, we have prepared polyclonal rabbit antibodies against synthetic peptides corresponding to the amino and carboxyl termini of the conceptual translation product of the hugl gene. The affinity-purified anti-HUGL antibodies recognize a single protein with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 115 kD. Similar to the Drosophila protein, HUGL is part of a cytoskeletal network and, is associated with nonmuscle myosin II heavy chain and a kinase that specifically phosphorylates HUGL at serine residues.

PMID:
7542763
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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