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Am J Public Health. 1995 Dec;85(12):1673-7.

The tracking of nutrient intake in young children: the Framingham Children's Study.

Author information

  • 1Evans Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, MA 02118, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study compared the nutrient intake of children at 3 through 4 years of age with that in subsequent years to determine whether nutrient intake tracked over time.

METHODS:

Intakes of 10 nutrients were estimated by means of multiple days of food diaries collected over a span of up to 6 years of follow-up for 95 children in the Framingham Children's Study. All diaries collected during each of three age periods (age 3 through 4, age 5 through 6, and age 7 through 8) were averaged. Nutrient density intakes at each age period were compared.

RESULTS:

Nutrient-specific correlations ranged from .37 to .63 between nutrient density intakes at age 3-4 and age 5-6. Correlations between intakes at age 3-4 and age 7-8 ranged from .35 to .62. Consistency of classification was strong; 35.7% to 57.1% of children in the highest quintile of intake at age 3-4 remained in that quintile at age 5-6, and 57.1% to 85.7% remained in the top two quintiles. At age 7-8, 40.0% to 66.7% of those with the highest intake at baseline were still in the top quintile, and 60.0% to 93.3% remained in the top two quintiles. Results were similar in the lowest quintile of intake. Extreme misclassification was rare.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggests that tracking of nutrient intake begins as young as 3-4 years of age.

PMID:
7503343
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1615722
Free PMC Article
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