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J Clin Epidemiol. 1995 Nov;48(11):1343-8.

Cerebrovascular disease in children under 16 years of age in the city of Dijon, France: a study of incidence and clinical features from 1985 to 1993.

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  • 1Stroke Registry of Dijon (INSERM/DGS), Service of Neurology, France.

Abstract

Our motivation for undertaking the present survey was to determine the incidence, the distribution, and the clinical features of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in children under 16 years old, in a well-defined population-based study. The survey was carried out on the population of the City of Dijon (150,000 inhibitants) from January 1, 1985 to December 31, 1993, collecting prospectively both in adulthood and in childhood (23,877 resident children). Diagnosis of stroke was established on the basis of clinical features and the mechanism was identified by CT scan from 1985 to 1987, and by CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging from 1987 to 1993. When a hemorrhagic stroke was identified, a cerebral arteriogram and an investigation of the coagulation factors were performed. When an ischemic stroke was identified, the following were performed: an ultrasound examination of the cervical arteries, a cerebral arteriogram, a lumbar puncture, an investigation of the coagulation factors and lipid status, a measurement of homocysteine in the plasma and the urine, an electrocardiogram (EKG), a Holter procedure, and a cardiac echography. During the 9 full calendar years of this study we observed 28 stroke patients from a population of 23,877 resident children. There were 17 cases of ischemic stroke, representing some 61% percent of the total, as well as 11 cases of hemorrhagic stroke, 39% percent of the total. The average annual incidence rate was 13.02/100,000 for all strokes, 7.91/100,000 for ischemic strokes, and 5.11/100,000 for hemorrhagic strokes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
7490597
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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