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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Oct;173(4):1042-8.

Underlying disorders associated with severe early-onset preeclampsia.

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  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Free University Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our purpose was to determine whether patients with severe early-onset preeclampsia have hemostatic or metabolic abnormalities that are associated with a tendency to vascular thrombosis.

STUDY DESIGN:

A total of 101 patients with a history of severe early-onset preeclampsia were tested at least 10 weeks post partum for the presence of hyperhomocysteinemia (methionine loading test), protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III deficiency, activated protein C resistance, lupus anticoagulant, and immunoglobulin G and/or M anticardiolipin antibodies.

RESULTS:

Of the 101 patients, 39 (38.6%) had chronic hypertension. Of the 85 patients tested for coagulation disturbances, 21 (24.7%) had protein S deficiency. Of the 50 patients tested for activated protein C resistance, 8 (16.0%) were positive. Of the 79 patients tested for hyperhomocysteinemia, 14 (17.7%) had a positive methionine loading test. Finally, 95 patients were tested for anticardiolipin antibodies; 27 (29.4%) had detectable immunoglobulin G and/or M anticardiolipin antibodies.

CONCLUSION:

Patients with a history of severe early-onset preeclampsia should be screened for protein S deficiency, activated protein C resistance, hyperhomocysteinemia, and anticardiolipin antibodies, since these results may have an impact on counseling for and pharmacologic management in future pregnancies.

Comment in

PMID:
7485291
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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