Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Am J Cardiol. 1995 Dec 1;76(16):1122-5.

Do gender-based differences in presentation and management influence predictors of hospitalization costs and length of stay after an acute myocardial infarction?

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital 02114, USA.

Abstract

Previous studies have reported conflicting results on gender differences in the management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and have not evaluated hospital length of stay or costs. To determine gender-based differences in presentation, management, length of stay, costs, and prognosis after AMI, we studied 561 patients with AMI. Women were older, had systemic hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and a non-Q-wave AMI more frequently, whereas more men smoked cigarettes. Predictors of coronary angiography were: male gender (RR 1.9; 95% CI 1.2 to 3.1), chest pain at presentation (RR 1.8; 95% CI 1.0 to 3.3), recurrent angina (RR 4.1; 95% CI 2.5 to 6.8), admission via the emergency room (RR 0.2; 95% CI 0.1 to 0.3), and younger age. Gender did not predict mortality. Among presenting features, the predictors of length of stay were diabetes, prior coronary bypass and prior coronary angioplasty in men, and age alone in women. Pulmonary edema and need for coronary bypass during the hospital course were predictors of length of stay in men only. Among presenting features, predictors of cost were diabetes in men and congestive heart failure in women. Predictors of cost during hospitalization for men were pulmonary edema, coronary angiography, intraaortic balloon pump use, and coronary bypass; for women, they were peak levels of creatine kinase and coronary bypass. Thus, predictors of length of stay and hospitalization costs differ based on gender. Efforts at cost containment may need to be gender-specific.

PMID:
7484895
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk