Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1982 Nov;32(5):612-21.

Platelet phenol sulfotransferase activity: correlation with sulfate conjugation of acetaminophen.

Abstract

Human platelets contain two independently regulated forms of the drug conjugating enzyme, phenol sulfotransferase (PST). One form of platelet PST activity is relatively thermolabile (TL) and the other is relatively thermostable (TS). Acetaminophen is a substrate for both the TS and TL forms of PST. Our aim was to determine whether individual variations in platelet PST activity might reflect variations in teh sulfate conjugation of oral acetaminophen. Platelet PST activity was measured in blood samples from 29 randomly selected subjects. There was no significant correlation between the independently regulated activities of the TS and TL forms of PST in the platelets of these subjects (r = 0.16, P less than 0.4). Each of the 29 subjects ingested 10 mg/kg acetaminophen and 24-hr urinary excretions of acetaminophen, acetaminophen glucuronide, and acetaminophen sulfate were measured. Average 24-hr urinary excretions of acetaminophen, acetaminophen glucuronide, and acetaminophen sulfate were 2.3%, 46.9%, and 35.0% of the total dose of drug. There were significant correlations between the activities of both the TS and TL forms of platelet PST and the excretion of acetaminophen sulfate expressed as a percentage of the dose of the drug (r = 0.62, P less than 0.001; r = 0.456, P less than 0.02). The correlation coefficient between the TS activity and the excretion of acetaminophen sulfate was significant when the excretion of sulfate conjugate was expressed as a percentage of the sum of acetaminophen plus conjugated metabolites excreted (r = 0.565, P less than 0.002). Our data demonstrate that relative levels of platelet PST activity reflect individual variations in the urinary excretion of the sulfate conjugate of acetaminophen.

PMID:
6957279
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk