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Fam Plann Perspect. 1983 May-Jun;15(3):119-26.

Impact of vacuum aspiration abortion on future childbearing: a review.

Abstract

Ever since induced abortion was legalized in the United States, there has been a running controversy over whether induced abortion affects subsequent childbearing; for example, it has been claimed that women who terminate a pregnancy are at a greater risk of miscarrying a subsequent pregnancy or of having a low-birth-weight baby. Ten studies of the later impact of first-trimester induced abortion by vacuum aspiration (the dominant method in the United States) are examined here; they find that compared with women who carry their first pregnancy to term, women whose first pregnancy ends in induced abortion have no greater risk of bearing low-birth-weight babies, delivering prematurely or suffering spontaneous abortions in subsequent pregnancies. However, these studies also show that induced abortion of a woman's first pregnancy does not have the protective effect on her first live birth that carrying a first birth to term has on later deliveries. In addition, some evidence from other studies links dilatation and curettage (D&C) procedures with later infertility, but most studies have found no such association. No definite conclusions can be reached about the impact of multiple induced abortions, since the results of 13 different epidemiologic studies are almost evenly divided between those that show no effect and those reporting related reproductive problems.

PIP:

Ever since induced abortion was legalized in the U.S. there has been a running controversy over whether induced abortion affects subsequent childbearing; for example, it has been claimed that women who terminate a pregnancy are at a greater risk of miscarrying a subsequent pregnancy or of having a low birthweight baby. 10 studies of the later impact of 1st trimester induced abortion by vacuum aspiration (the dominant method in the U.S.) are examined; compared with women who carry their 1st pregnancy to term, women whose 1st pregnancy ends in induced abortion have no greater risk of bearing low birthweight babies, delivering prematurely or suffering spontaneous abortions in subsequent pregnancies. However, these studies also show that induced abortion of a woman's 1st pregnancy is without the protective effect on her 1st live birth that carrying a 1st birth to term has on later deliveries. In addition, some evidence from other studies links dilatation and curettage procedures with later infertility, but most studies have found no such association. No definite conclusions can be reached about the impact of multiple induced abortions, since the results of 13 different epidemiologic studies are almost evenly divided between those that show no effect and those reporting related reproductive problems. author's modified

PMID:
6347709
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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