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J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1983 Sep;226(3):686-700.

Sertraline, 1S,4S-N-methyl-4-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthylamine, a new uptake inhibitor with selectivity for serotonin.

Abstract

Sertraline [1S,4S-N-methyl-4-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthylamine] was found to be a highly selective and potent competitive inhibitor of synaptosomal serotonin uptake. Sertraline also selectively reduced ex vivo uptake of serotonin and strongly antagonized the serotonin-depleting action of p-chloroamphetamine, indicating potent blockade of serotonin uptake in vivo. Acute and repeated dosing of sertraline decreased serotonin content of whole blood. Sertraline only weakly inhibited rat heart uptake of i.v. [3H]norepinephrine. In substantiation of selective blockade of serotonin uptake, sertraline potentiated various symptoms of 5-hydroxytryptophan but did not reverse reserpine-induced hypothermia. Sertraline was a very weak inhibitor of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to rat brain membranes in vitro and did not produce anticholinergic effects in mice in vivo. Sertraline was well tolerated in mice, rats and dogs, with no locomotor stimulant effects in rats or untoward cardiovascular effects in dogs. The major metabolite, N-demethylsertraline, was also a selective serotonin uptake blocker. Sertraline strongly reduced immobility of mice in the Porsolt swim test for antidepressants. After repeated dosing in rats, sertraline diminished the cyclic AMP response of limbic forebrain adenylate cyclase to norepinephrine, as well as the binding of [3H]dihydroalprenolol to cortical membranes. It is proposed that selective blockade of serotonin reuptake can induce activation of norepinephrine neurons and subsequent down-regulation of norepinephrine receptors and that sertraline, a highly selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake, may be an efficacious antidepressant without anticholinergic or cardiovascular side-effects.

PMID:
6310078
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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