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J Appl Physiol (1985). 1985 Jan;58(1):230-5.

Endurance training and glucose conversion into triglycerides in human fat cells.

Abstract

To study the influence of endurance training on glucose conversion into fat cell triglycerides, 24 (13 women, 11 men) inactive subjects (25.0 +/- 3.8 yr of age) took part in a 20-wk ergocycle training program 4 days and increasing to 5 days/wk, 40-45 min/day, starting at 60% and increasing to 85% of the heart rate reserve. Several body fatness indicators were measured before and after the training program: seven skinfold thicknesses, percent fat, and mean fat cell weight. Fat cell basal and maximal insulin-stimulated glucose conversion into triglycerides were also determined using [14C]glucose. Body fatness indicators decreased significantly after training only in male subjects (P less than 0.05). Basal and maximal insulin-stimulated glucose conversion into triglycerides increased significantly with training (P less than 0.05): pretest values (nanomoles glucose per hour per 10(6) cells) being 24.9 +/- 2.1 and 28.7 +/- 2.5, while post-test values were 30.1 +/- 3.2 and 33.0 +/- 3.4 for basal and insulin-stimulated values, respectively. However, this lipogenic increase was only observed in male subjects (P less than 0.01). Changes in body fatness indicators induced by training were negatively correlated with changes induced in fat cell glucose conversion into triglycerides (-0.24 less than or equal to r less than or equal to -0.45). These results demonstrate that endurance training increases fat cell glucose conversion into triglycerides and suggest that adipose tissue metabolism is part of the adaptive response to training. Moreover, it appears that adipose tissue response to aerobic training is more efficient in males than in females.

PMID:
3881382
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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