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Ann Intern Med. 1986 Sep;105(3):337-42.

Pressure sores among hospitalized patients.

Abstract

A cross-sectional survey was done to determine the prevalence of pressure sores in hospitalized patients and the factors associated with having a pressure sore in the hospital. Among 634 adult patients, 30 (4.7%; 3.1% to 6.3%, 95% confidence interval) had a pressure sore and 78 (12.3%; 9.8% to 14.8%) were at risk for a pressure sore because they had been confined to a bed or chair for at least 1 week. Comparing these two groups of patients, we found that fecal incontinence, diarrhea, fractures, urinary catheter use, decreased weight, dementia, and hypoalbuminemia were associated with having pressure sores (p less than or equal to 0.05). Using logistic regression analysis, hypoalbuminemia, fecal incontinence, and fractures remained significantly and independently associated with having a pressure sore (odds ratios = 3.0, 3.1, and 5.2, respectively; p less than or equal to 0.05). Our findings suggest that 17% (14% to 20%) of hospitalized patients have pressure sores or are at risk for them, and that hypoalbuminemia, fecal incontinence, and fractures may identify bedridden patients at greatest risk.

PMID:
3740674
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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