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Gastroenterology. 1987 Sep;93(3):498-505.

Temporal relationship between the impairment of free water excretion and antidiuretic hormone hypersecretion in rats with experimental cirrhosis.

Abstract

To investigate the temporal relationship between the impairment of water excretion, sodium retention, and antidiuretic hormone hypersecretion in cirrhosis, free water excretion (estimated by the minimum urinary osmolality) and urinary antidiuretic hormone excretion (which correlates with the plasma levels of this hormone) were measured weekly after an oral water load in 18 rats with carbon tetrachloride-induced cirrhosis and in 20 control animals. The onset of ascites (as an index of sodium retention) in cirrhotic rats was estimated by sequential paracentesis. Thirteen cirrhotic animals developed an impairment of water excretion 2-5 wk after the onset of ascites. The urinary excretion of antidiuretic hormone in these animals, which was normal before the impairment of water excretion, increased markedly within the week in which this abnormality was first detected and remained high thereafter. The remaining 5 cirrhotic rats did not experience an impairment of free water excretion in spite of developing ascites. The urinary excretion of antidiuretic hormone in these animals was similar to that of control rats during the entire study. In all urine samples obtained from cirrhotic rats, there was a highly significant direct linear correlation between the urinary excretion of antidiuretic hormone and the minimum urinary osmolality. Our results show the following: in rats with carbon tetrachloride-induced cirrhosis, sodium retention preceded the impairment of water excretion; and in these animals, the defect in water metabolism correlated chronologically and quantitatively with antidiuretic hormone hypersecretion. These findings are consistent with the concept that antidiuretic hormone is a major determinant of the impaired water metabolism in cirrhosis.

PMID:
3609659
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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