Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Hepatol. 1986;3(1):111-7.

Urinary excretion of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha, thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 in cirrhosis with ascites. Relationship to functional renal failure (hepatorenal syndrome).

Abstract

The aim of the study was to investigate the urinary excretion of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (a stable metabolite of PGI2), thromboxane B2 (TxB2; a stable metabolite of TxA2), and PGE2 in 18 normal subjects, 49 cirrhotics with ascites without renal failure (GFR = 90 +/- 4 ml/min, means +/- S.E.M.) and 20 cirrhotics with functional renal failure (FRF) (GFR = 36 +/- 3). The study was made after 5 days on a 50 mEq sodium diet and without diuretics. Plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma norepinephrine concentration (NE) and plasma antidiuretic hormone concentration (ADH) were also measured. Cirrhotics without FRF showed a significantly higher urinary excretion of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, TxB2 and PGE, (15.9 +/- 1.7 ng/h, 3.0 +/- 0.3 ng/h, and 6.2 +/- 1.0 ng/h) than did normal subjects (9.2 +/- 0.9, 1.3 +/- 0.1 and 2.3 +/- 0.4). On the contrary, the urinary excretion of these prostaglandins was normal or reduced in patients with FRF (5.3 +/- 0.8, 1.3 +/- 0.2 and 1.9 +/- 0.4). PRA, NE and ADH were significantly increased in cirrhotics with FRF (15.2 +/- 3.9 ng/ml/h, 1026 +/- 149 pg/ml and 4.1 +/- 0.3 pg/ml) and in patients without FRF (8.0 +/- 1.4, 667 +/- 67 and 3.9 +/- 0.3) as compared to normal controls (1.3 +/- 0.2, 275 +/- 46 and 2.4 +/- 0.2). These results suggest that renal hemodynamics in cirrhosis depends upon a critical equilibrium between the activity of endogenous vasoconstrictor systems and the renal production of the vasodilator prostaglandins PGI2 and PGE2. In addition, they do not support FRF in cirrhosis being related to an increased renal production of the vasoconstrictor prostaglandin TxA2.

PMID:
3462243
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk