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J Biol Chem. 1988 Jan 5;263(1):9-12.

cDNA, deduced polypeptide structure and chromosomal assignment of human pulmonary surfactant proteolipid, SPL(pVal).

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  • 1University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Ohio 45267-0541.

Abstract

In hyaline membrane disease of premature infants, lack of surfactant leads to pulmonary atelectasis and respiratory distress. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins of Mr = 5,000-14,000 have been isolated from mammalian surfactants which enhance the rate of spreading and the surface tension lowering properties of phospholipids during dynamic compression. We have characterized the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of pulmonary proteolipids from ether/ethanol extracts of bovine, canine, and human surfactant. Two distinct peptides were identified and termed SPL(pVal) and SPL(Phe). An oligonucleotide probe based on the valine-rich amino-terminal amino acid sequence of SPL(pVal) was utilized to isolate cDNA and genomic DNA encoding the human protein, termed surfactant proteolipid SPL(pVal) on the basis of its unique polyvaline domain. The primary structure of a precursor protein of 20,870 daltons, containing the SPL(pVal) peptide, was deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the cDNAs. Hybrid-arrested translation and immunoprecipitation of labeled translation products of human mRNA demonstrated an Mr = 22,000 precursor protein, the active hydrophobic peptide being produced by proteolytic processing to Mr = 5,000-6,000. Two classes of cDNAs encoding SPL(pVal) were identified. mRNA of approximately 900 bases was identified on Northern analysis of fetal and adult RNA. Human SPL(pVal) mRNA was more abundant in the adult than in fetal lung. The SPL(pVal) gene locus was assigned to chromosome 8.

PMID:
3335510
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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