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J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1988 Oct 15;193(8):927-31.

Serum and peritoneal fluid phosphate concentrations as predictors of major intestinal injury associated with equine colic.

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  • 1Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing 48824-1101.

Abstract

To determine the reliability with which inorganic phosphorus (phosphate) concentrations can be used to predict major intestinal injury associated with equine colic, phosphate concentrations were measured in serum, peritoneal fluid, or both from 9 clinically normal adult horses (group A), 37 horses successfully managed medically for signs of abdominal pain (group B), 26 horses with signs of abdominal pain and undergoing exploratory laparotomy without intestinal resection (group C), and 26 horses undergoing intestinal resection or euthanasia for extensive intestinal lesions (group D). Peritoneal fluid phosphate concentration was significantly greater in horses in group D (mean, 4.58 +/- 0.34 mg/dl) than in horses in group A (mean, 2.78 +/- 0.21 mg/dl), group B (mean, 2.92 +/- 0.27 mg/dl), and group C (mean, 2.98 +/- 0.28 mg/dl; P less than or equal to 0.01). Serum phosphate concentration was significantly greater in horses in group D (mean, 3.87 +/- 0.30 mg/dl) than in horses in group A (mean, 2.73 +/- 0.22 mg/dl), group B (mean, 2.80 +/- 0.21 mg/dl), and group C (mean, 2.78 +/- 0.22 mg/dl); P less than or equal to 0.05). There was significant (P less than or equal to 0.001) correlation between serum and peritoneal fluid phosphate concentrations within each group and when pairs from all groups were pooled. When peritoneal fluid phosphate concentrations exceeded 3.6 mg/dl, intestinal lesions requiring resection or euthanasia were predicted with sensitivity of 77% and specificity of 76%. When serum phosphate concentrations exceeded 3.3 mg/dl, such lesions were predicted with sensitivity of 60% and specificity of 73%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
3192473
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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