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Physiologie. 1988 Jul-Sep;25(3):137-49.

Changes induced in the bioelectric activity of rat subcortical nervous structures by Gerovital H3 and Aslavital as compared to procaine.

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  • 1University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Biology, Romania.

Abstract

Intravenous injection of Gerovital H3 and procaine (20 mg/kg b.w.) into white Wistar rats anaesthetized with nembutal (40 mg/kg b.w.) produces a constant decrease of the wave frequency, more visible at the level of the lateral hypothalamus, but also present in the midbrain reticular formation (the two subcortical nervous structures studied). The wave amplitude is also decreased, especially in the lateral hypothalamus, but the differences gradually recover, a fact more visible in the case of Gerovital H3. Aslavital has similar effects on the wave amplitude, whereas the changes produced in the wave frequency are generally more superficial and transitory. Moreover, the frequency variations in the reticular formation are opposite to those observed in the lateral hypothalamus (i.e., an increase instead of a decrease). Direct intrahypothalamic administration of the drugs (16 micrograms procaine/animal) induces a pattern of responses which is generally opposite to that observed for intravenous injection. Also, the changes produced in the lateral hypothalamus are more superficial this time. An opposition between the effects of Aslavital and of the other two drugs can be observed in this case for the wave amplitude, which is usually increased by procaine and Gerovital H3 and decreased by Aslavital. In many cases, Aslavital induces a burst of positive sharp waves reminiscent of the epileptiform abnormality. The differences observed are tentatively explained by us in terms of dose, drug composition and selective action upon different nervous structures.

PMID:
3144011
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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