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Cell. 1986 Nov 7;47(3):333-48.

The T4 gene encodes the AIDS virus receptor and is expressed in the immune system and the brain.

Abstract

The isolation of clones encoding the human surface protein T4, and the expression of the T4 gene in new cellular environments, have enabled us to examine the role of this protein in the pathogenesis of AIDS. Our studies support a mechanism of AIDS virus infection that initially involves the specific interaction of the AIDS virus with T4 molecules on the cell surface. This association can be demonstrated on T4+ transformed T and B lymphocytes as well as epithelial cells. Furthermore, the presence of T4 on the surface of all human cells examined is sufficient to render these cells susceptible to AIDS virus infection. Our data suggest that the T4-AIDS virus complex is then internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Finally, we find that the T4 gene is expressed in the brain as well as in lymphoid cells, providing an explanation for the dual neurotropic and lymphotropic character of the AIDS virus. In this manner, a T lymphocyte surface protein important in mediating effector cell-target cell interactions has been exploited by a human retrovirus to specifically target the AIDS virus to populations of T4+ cells.

PMID:
3094962
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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