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Ann Surg. 1986 Nov;204(5):600-5.

Utility of operative ultrasound in the surgical management of liver tumors.

Abstract

In this study the utility of operative ultrasound in the surgical management of 98 consecutive patients with liver and gastrointestinal tumors was assessed. All patients had preoperative work-up including ultrasound study of the liver as well as selective hepatic arteriography (50 patients) and computerized tomography of the liver (45 patients). At surgery, inspection and palpation of the liver as well as operative ultrasound examination were performed in all cases. Fifty-six patients were known to have liver tumors before operation, while 42 patients had their liver examined as part of the treatment of a primary gastrointestinal malignancy. A total of 126 liver tumors were found in 58 patients, all of whom were confirmed histologically. Eighteen nodules unsuspected before operation were found at surgery--nine by inspection and palpation of the liver, and nine others that were nonpalpable were found by operative ultrasound only. Eighteen lesions that were missed by all diagnostic modalities were found as secondary lesions on pathologic examination of the resected specimens. In addition to diagnostic applications, operative ultrasound was useful in localizing nodules and permitting guided biopsies deep in the hepatic parenchyma. In eight cases, segmental resections were performed with operative ultrasound to localize the plane of section and to catheterize the intrahepatic portal vein branch afferent to the tumor in order to perform balloon catheter occlusion of the vessel for control of bleeding. Operative ultrasound was found to be important in the surgical management of 19 of 98 patients (19%).

PMID:
3021072
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1251346
Free PMC Article
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