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J Biol Chem. 1988 Jan 5;263(1):427-35.

Localization of the actin-binding sites of Acanthamoeba myosin IB and effect of limited proteolysis on its actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activity.

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  • 1Laboratory of Cell Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892.

Abstract

Acanthamoeba myosin IB contains a 125-kDa heavy chain that has high actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activity when 1 serine residue is phosphorylated. The heavy chain contains two F-actin-binding sites, one associated with the catalytic site and a second which allows myosin IB to cross-link actin filaments but has no direct effect on catalytic activity. Tryptic digestion of the heavy chain initially produces an NH2-terminal 62-kDa peptide that contains the ATP-binding site and the regulatory phosphorylation site, and a COOH-terminal 68-kDa peptide. F-actin, in the absence of ATP, protects this site and tryptic cleavage then produces an NH2-terminal 80-kDa peptide. Both the 62- and the 80-kDa peptides retain the (NH+4,EDTA)-ATPase activity of native myosin IB and both bind to F-actin in an ATP-sensitive manner. However, only the 80-kDa peptide retains a major portion of the actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activity. This activity requires phosphorylation of the 80-kDa peptide by myosin I heavy chain kinase but, in contrast to the activity of intact myosin IB, it has a simple, hyperbolic dependence on the concentration of F-actin. Also unlike myosin IB, the 80-kDa peptide cannot cross-link F-actin filaments indicating the presence of only a single actin-binding site. These results allow the assignment of the actin-binding site involved in catalytic activity to the region near, and possibly on both sides of, the tryptic cleavage site 62 kDa from the NH2 terminus, and the second actin-binding site to the COOH-terminal 45-kDa domain. Thus, the NH2-terminal 80 kDa of the myosin IB heavy chain is functionally similar to the 93-kDa subfragment 1 of muscle myosin and most likely has a similar organization of functional domains.

PMID:
2961746
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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