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Am J Public Health. 2015 Jun;105(6):1213-9. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2014.302482. Epub 2015 Apr 16.

E-cigarette use in the past and quitting behavior in the future: a population-based study.

Author information

  • 1Wael K. Al-Delaimy, Eric C. Leas, and David R. Strong are with the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego. Mark G. Myers is with the Psychology Service, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, and the Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego. C. Richard Hofstetter is with the Graduate School of Public Health and the Department of Political Science, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We examined whether smokers who used e-cigarettes are more likely to quit after 1 year than smokers who had never used e-cigarettes.

METHODS:

We surveyed California smokers (n = 1000) at 2 time points 1 year apart. We conducted logistic regression analyses to determine whether history of e-cigarette use at baseline predicted quitting behavior at follow-up, adjusting for demographics and smoking behavior at baseline. We limited analyses to smokers who reported consistent e-cigarette behavior at baseline and follow-up.

RESULTS:

Compared with smokers who never used e-cigarettes, smokers who ever used e-cigarettes were significantly less likely to decrease cigarette consumption (odds ratio [OR] = 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.30, 0.87), and significantly less likely to quit for 30 days or more at follow-up (OR = 0.41; 95% CI = 0.18, 0.93). Ever-users of e-cigarettes were more likely to report a quit attempt, although this was not statistically significant (OR = 1.15; 95% CI = 0.67, 1.97).

CONCLUSIONS:

Smokers who have used e-cigarettes may be at increased risk for not being able to quit smoking. These findings, which need to be confirmed by longer-term cohort studies, have important policy and regulation implications regarding the use of e-cigarettes among smokers.

PMID:
25880947
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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