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Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2015 Dec;35:63-72. doi: 10.1016/j.copbio.2015.03.008. Epub 2015 Apr 2.

C1-carbon sources for chemical and fuel production by microbial gas fermentation.

Author information

  • 1Institut für Mikrobiologie und Biotechnologie, Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm, Germany. Electronic address: peter.duerre@uni-ulm.de.
  • 2Institut für Mikrobiologie und Biotechnologie, Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm, Germany.

Abstract

Fossil resources for production of fuels and chemicals are finite and fuel use contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and global warming. Thus, sustainable fuel supply, security, and prices necessitate the implementation of alternative routes to the production of chemicals and fuels. Much attention has been focussed on use of cellulosic material, particularly through microbial-based processes. However, this is still costly and proving challenging, as are catalytic routes to biofuels from whole biomass. An alternative strategy is to directly capture carbon before incorporation into lignocellulosic biomass. Autotrophic acetogenic, carboxidotrophic, and methanotrophic bacteria are able to capture carbon as CO, CO2, or CH4, respectively, and reuse that carbon in products that displace their fossil-derived counterparts. Thus, gas fermentation represents a versatile industrial platform for the sustainable production of commodity chemicals and fuels from diverse gas resources derived from industrial processes, coal, biomass, municipal solid waste (MSW), and extracted natural gas.

Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
25841103
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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