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J Appl Physiol (1985). 2015 Apr 15;118(8):1006-13. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00928.2014. Epub 2015 Feb 26.

Change in weight and body composition in obese subjects following a hypocaloric diet plus different training programs or physical activity recommendations.

Author information

  • 1Laboratorio de Fisiología del Esfuerzo Research Group, Department of Health and Human Performance, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain;
  • 2Department of Nutrition, Hospital La Paz Health Research Institute, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain; and.
  • 3Laboratorio de Fisiología del Esfuerzo Research Group, Department of Health and Human Performance, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain; pedroj.benito@upm.es.
  • 4Laboratorio de Fisiología del Esfuerzo Research Group, Department of Health and Human Performance, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain; Faculty of Law and Social Sciences, Universidad Francisco de Vitoria, Pozuelo de Alarcón, Spain.

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of different physical activity programs, in combination with a hypocaloric diet, on anthropometric variables and body composition in obese subjects. Ninety-six obese (men: n = 48; women: n = 48; age range: 18-50 yr) participated in a supervised 22-wk program. They were randomized into four groups: strength training (S; n = 24), endurance training (E; n = 26), combined strength + endurance training (SE; n = 24), and physical activity recommendations (C; n = 22). In addition, all groups followed the same hypocaloric diet. At baseline and at the end of the intervention, dietetic and physical activity variables were assessed using validated questionnaires. Anthropometric variables were recorded along with body composition variables measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry techniques. At the end of the intervention, significant improvements were seen within groups in terms of body weight (S: -9.21 ± 0.83 kg; E: -10.55 ± 0.80 kg; SE: -9.88 ± 0.85 kg; C: -8.69 ± 0.89 kg), and total fat mass (S: -5.24 ± 0.55%; E: -5.35 ± 0.55%; SE: -4.85 ± 0.56%; C: -4.89 ± 0.59%). No differences were seen between groups at this time in terms of any other anthropometric or body composition variables examined. All groups increased their total physical activity in metabolic equivalents (MET) per week during the intervention, but with no difference between groups (S: 976 ± 367 MET-min/wk; E: 954 ± 355 MET-min/wk; SE: 1 329 ± 345 MET-min/wk; C: 763 ± 410 MET-min/wk). This study shows that, when combined with a hypocaloric diet, exercise training and adherence to physical activity recommendations are equally effective at reducing body weight and modifying body composition in the treatment of obesity (Clinical Trials Gov. number: NCT01116856).

Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

KEYWORDS:

aerobic exercise; body composition; dietary modification; physical activity; strength training

PMID:
25722378
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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