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Diabetes Care. 2015 Mar;38(3):529-37. doi: 10.2337/dc14-2073.

Sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

Author information

  • 1Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China MOE Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China.
  • 2MOE Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China.
  • 3Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
  • 4Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA lgliu@mails.tjmu.edu.cn frank.hu@channing.harvard.edu.
  • 5Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China MOE Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China lgliu@mails.tjmu.edu.cn frank.hu@channing.harvard.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

It remains unclear how many hours of sleep are associated with the lowest risk of type 2 diabetes. This meta-analysis was performed to assess the dose-response relationship between sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

PubMed and Embase were searched up to 20 March 2014 for prospective observational studies that assessed the relationship of sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes. Both semiparametric and parametric methods were used.

RESULTS:

Ten articles with 11 reports were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. A total of 18,443 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were ascertained among 482,502 participants with follow-up periods ranging from 2.5 to 16 years. A U-shaped dose-response relationship was observed between sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes, with the lowest risk observed at a sleep duration category of 7-8 h per day. Compared with 7-h sleep duration per day, the pooled relative risks for type 2 diabetes were 1.09 (95% CI 1.04-1.15) for each 1-h shorter sleep duration among individuals who slept <7 h per day and 1.14 (1.03-1.26) for each 1-h increment of sleep duration among individuals with longer sleep duration.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies shows a U-shaped relationship between sleep duration and risk of type 2 diabetes, with the lowest type 2 diabetes risk at 7-8 h per day of sleep duration. Both short and long sleep duration are associated with a significantly increased risk of type 2 diabetes, underscoring the importance of appropriate sleep duration in the delay or prevention of type 2 diabetes.

© 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

PMID:
25715415
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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