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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Mar;100(3):E416-26. doi: 10.1210/jc.2014-2566. Epub 2015 Feb 10.

Napping reverses the salivary interleukin-6 and urinary norepinephrine changes induced by sleep restriction.

Author information

  • 1Université Paris Descartes-Sorbonne Paris Cité, APHP, Hôtel Dieu de Paris, Centre du Sommeil et de la Vigilance (B.F., C.D., M.E., F.S., D.L.), EA 7330 VIFASOM, Paris, France; Université Paris Descartes-Sorbonne Paris Cité, APHP, Hôtel Dieu de Paris, Laboratoire de Chimie Clinique et Laboratoire de Biologie de la Nutrition (S.N., J-P.D.), EA 4466, Centre de Recherche Pharmaceutique de Paris, France; IRBA (Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées) (C.D., F.S.), Unité Fatique Vigilance, Paris, France.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Neuroendocrine and immune stresses imposed by chronic sleep restriction are known to be involved in the harmful cardiovascular effects associated with poor sleep.

OBJECTIVES:

Despite a well-known beneficial effect of napping on alertness, its effects on neuroendocrine stress and immune responses after sleep restriction are largely unknown.

DESIGN:

This study was a strictly controlled (sleep-wake status, light environment, caloric intake), crossover, randomized design in continuously polysomnography-monitored subjects.

SETTING:

The study was conducted in a laboratory-based study.

PARTICIPANTS:

The subjects were 11 healthy young men.

INTERVENTION:

We investigated the effects on neuroendocrine and immune biomarkers of a night of sleep restricted to 2 h followed by a day without naps or with 30 minute morning and afternoon naps, both conditions followed by an ad libitum recovery night starting at 20:00.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Salivary interleukin-6 and urinary catecholamines were assessed throughout the daytime study periods.

RESULTS:

The increase in norepinephrine values seen at the end of the afternoon after the sleep-restricted night was not present when the subjects had the opportunity to take naps. Interleukin-6 changes observed after sleep deprivation were also normalized after napping. During the recovery day in the no-nap condition, there were increased levels of afternoon epinephrine and dopamine, which was not the case in the nap condition. A recovery night after napping was associated with a reduced amount of slow-wave sleep compared to after the no-nap condition.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data suggest that napping has stress-releasing and immune effects. Napping could be easily applied in real settings as a countermeasure to the detrimental health consequences of sleep debt.

PMID:
25668196
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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