Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nat Genet. 2015 Mar;47(3):242-9. doi: 10.1038/ng.3195. Epub 2015 Jan 19.

Evolutionary history and global spread of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing lineage.

Author information

  • 1Molecular Mycobacteriology, Research Center Borstel, Borstel, Germany.
  • 21] Laboratoire Biologie Intégrative des Population, Evolution Moléculaire, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Paris, France. [2] Institut de Systématique, Evolution, Biodiversité, UMR-CNRS 7205, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Sorbonne Universités, Paris, France.
  • 3Université Joseph Fourier, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Laboratoire Techniques de l'Ingénierie Médicale et de la Complexité-Informatique, Mathématiques et Applications, Grenoble, France.
  • 41] INSERM U1019, Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille, Lille, France. [2] Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 8204, Lille, France. [3] Université Lille Nord, Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille, Lille, France. [4] Institut Pasteur de Lille, Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille, Lille, France.
  • 5National Reference Center for Mycobacteria, Research Center Borstel, Borstel, Germany.
  • 6Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, St. Petersburg Pasteur Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia.
  • 7Centre for Biomedical Research, Burnet Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
  • 8Genoscreen, Lille, France.
  • 9Medical Department, Médecins sans Frontières Switzerland, Geneva, Switzerland.
  • 10Department of Microbiology, National Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases Research Institute, Warsaw, Poland.
  • 11Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
  • 12Instituto de Medicina Tropical Alexander von Humboldt, Molecular Epidemiology Unit-Tuberculosis, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
  • 13Department of Medical Parasitology and Infection Biology, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland.
  • 14Tuberculosis Research Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, US National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
  • 15Clinical Research Department, Epicentre, Paris, France.
  • 16Emerging Bacterial Pathogens Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
  • 17Department of Microbiology, Hospital Universitario de Gran Canaria Dr. Negrín, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.
  • 18Division of Medical Microbiology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • 191] Centre for Biomedical Research, Burnet Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Department of Infectious Diseases, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [3] Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
  • 20National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory, Phthysiopneumology Institute, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova.
  • 21Institute for Epidemiology, Schleswig-Holstein University Hospital, Kiel, Germany.
  • 221] Public Health England National Mycobacterial Reference Laboratory and Clinical Tuberculosis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Group, Queen Mary's School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK. [2] Department of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College, London, UK.
  • 23Tuberculosis and Mycobacteria, Scientific Institute of Public Health, Brussels, Belgium.
  • 24Department of Microbiology, Public Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
  • 25Department of Science and Technology/National Research Foundation, Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Tuberculosis Research/Medical Research Council, Centre for Tuberculosis Research, Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • 26Department of Diagnostics and Vaccinology, Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control, Solna, Sweden.
  • 27Key Laboratory of Major Diseases in Children and National Key Discipline of Pediatrics (Capital Medical University), Ministry of Education, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
  • 28US Agency for International Development Quality Health Care Project, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan.
  • 29Samara Oblast Tuberculosis Service, Samara, Russia.
  • 30Statens Serum Institute, International Reference Laboratory of Mycobacteriology, Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • 31Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 32World Health Organization Supranational Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory, Institut Pasteur de la Guadeloupe, Abymes, France.
  • 33Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón, Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet, Zaragoza, Spain.
  • 34Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.
  • 35Central Tuberculosis Laboratory, Department of Pathology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore.
  • 36Department of Immunology and Cell Biology, Institute of Biotechnology, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania.
  • 37Tartu University Hospital United Laboratories, Mycobacteriology, Tartu, Estonia.
  • 38Medical Department, Médecins sans Frontières, Paris, France.
  • 391] INSERM U1019, Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille, Lille, France. [2] Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 8204, Lille, France. [3] Université Lille Nord, Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille, Lille, France. [4] Institut Pasteur de Lille, Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille, Lille, France. [5] Genoscreen, Lille, France.
  • 401] Molecular Mycobacteriology, Research Center Borstel, Borstel, Germany. [2] German Center for Infection Research, Borstel Site, Borstel, Germany.

Abstract

Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains of the Beijing lineage are globally distributed and are associated with the massive spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis in Eurasia. Here we reconstructed the biogeographical structure and evolutionary history of this lineage by genetic analysis of 4,987 isolates from 99 countries and whole-genome sequencing of 110 representative isolates. We show that this lineage initially originated in the Far East, from where it radiated worldwide in several waves. We detected successive increases in population size for this pathogen over the last 200 years, practically coinciding with the Industrial Revolution, the First World War and HIV epidemics. Two MDR clones of this lineage started to spread throughout central Asia and Russia concomitantly with the collapse of the public health system in the former Soviet Union. Mutations identified in genes putatively under positive selection and associated with virulence might have favored the expansion of the most successful branches of the lineage.

PMID:
25599400
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk